lutherrosereformation5002017

Martin Luther Rose (from Reformation 500 Tour 2017) (c) 2017 Trina Lambert

I tend to spend my Saturdays away from the news, concentrating on household, family, and personal needs. Sometimes I forget that it appears that when the Leader of the Free World takes time away from the White House on weekends, he may squeeze in some recreation time by golfing, but he also tends to create more news by tweeting. Then I wake up on Sunday and realize more damage has been done to another group of people or individuals who have been attacked in a most unprofessional and cruel way. Oh, I pray in church, Lord do I pray—and sometimes I even begin writing blog posts.

At one time, I worked for a manager who was socially tone deaf. In his case, I don’t think he meant to harm people with what he said, but he did anyway. One day he came out to make small talk with his team, and then looked at my coworker and said, “My you look fat today, Steve.” I had had enough, even if he was my boss. I told him that we as people don’t always say what’s on our minds and he replied, “Well, I do.”

I told him he shouldn’t, but should do it based upon the situation at hand. Forgive me, but I still believe that sometimes we should moderate our unkind thoughts.

For everyone who says they elected the current president because he speaks his mind and just says what everyone else is thinking—well, then shame on you for thinking that we should all share our worst thoughts. We as a nation have elevated someone who cannot and will not stop speaking in awful ways—both about and to other people. And he does so in our names!

There was a time when we as a society knew it was impolite to say certain things. You can tell yourselves that was being too PC (politically correct), but it was simply about manners. Quite frankly, many of these derogatory terms and slights are really not as offensive to people higher up in the power structure than they are to those in the lower rungs of society. (You know, people who experience prejudice based upon something about their race, sex, religious beliefs—anything where you can start out an accusation with a “you people” before it.)

But they offend me—and I know they do offend many people who are part of a “privileged” group, despite our backgrounds. Just because I am a descendant of blonde Germans and Danes doesn’t make me special. Down one branch I have relatives whose robes (think triple letters in the middle of the alphabet) were found in their closet when they died. I cannot atone for their actions, words, or beliefs, but I can be held responsible for my own—and for how I raised my children who are grown adults now, and who are also appalled with what is being said and done by the highest officer of this nation.

What happened to all the “radical” songs of love we sang in church in the 70s? Did we not mean them? In my church, we sang from Ray Stevens’ “Everyone is Beautiful”: “Jesus loves the little children, all the children all of the world, red and yellow black and white they are precious in his sight, Jesus loves the little children of the world.” I still think all children are precious: blonde-, black-, red-, brown-, blue-, or no-haired. I think we should care if their homes are flooded or if their cities are bombed or if they’re afraid of the law enforcement people who are called to protect them. I want to believe our level of caring has nothing to do with whether they’re brown or shades of it—or not.

And on that topic, if the leader won’t choose to say something in a respectful and decent manner, then I don’t care to hear what his innermost thoughts are. Instead, I want him to act and speak with the gravity of speaking for our nation. Or how about speaking simply with the civility many of us strove to teach our children? In our house, we didn’t say the “s” word (“stupid”). My kids were taught that it’s not okay to call people names (especially the kind that used to be bleeped out on TV) or tell them they are something such as a lazy person versus someone exhibiting an attribute such as acting lazy. Instead, you call out their actions and behaviors—using factual proofs, of course, not just innuendo.

A person who is acting a certain way is not necessarily that at his or her core. Unless the actions happen again and again without changing and without apology or any demonstration of a belief that anything needs to change. In that case, you get to judge a person on the content of the character as demonstrated.

Authority is earned. Consider me civilly disobedient.

Respectfully submitted,

A Concerned Citizen of the USA and a Child of God

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